Highlights from UX Thursday Detroit 2013


[MUSIC PLAYING] I think that UX is happening
everywhere. We need to sort of acknowledge
that it’s not a thing that’s relegated to San Francisco,
or New York, or Boston, or Chicago. That it’s something that happens
in companies that are in Grand Rapids or companies
that are in Toledo. I’ve had a chance to talk to
a lot of people here today. And they’ve been super excited
about the fact that UIE and Vitamin T partnered
up to bring UX Thursday into Detroit. The importance for us as agents
of Vitamin T to be here because, you know, we’re
not just here to put people into jobs. We’re here to put people
into careers. And that starts with knowing
what they do. So being here and learning about
the different aspects of user experience and all it’s
facets was important to us. We always want to be learning so
that we can actually relate and talk to user experience
designers as opposed to just, you know, trying to
sell the job. It was definitely
invigorating. I mean, we haven’t had anything
like this in this area for so long. It’s definitely kind of a, you
know, good kick in the butt. I think, in general, like, we
had really good local talent, too, represented. So it was really good to kind
of connect with others and kind of see what other people
in that area are doing. This is the first conference
I’ve ever attended, US conference , of any
kind, anywhere. And if I could sum this up in
one word, I’d say impeccable. Each one of the presenters
was very direct. They were very thorough. They presented things that were
relevant, things that I took a lot of great to-do notes
that I can go and apply right away. I was reminded of some things. I was stirred up. I’m excited. I’m ready to go. This is great stuff. They got to do this
again soon. Oh, man, I thought
today was great. You know, as a content writer,
especially hearing from MailChimp, stuff like
that, it was great. Got a lot of good feedback. Hopefully we’ll take it back
with us to our companies who are implementing a lot
of this stuff. I work for MailChimp, which is
an email newsletter, email marketing company. And I work on MailChimp
content. So I spend a lot of time copy
writing and editing and working kind of across
departments on our Voice and Tone. And a big part of Voice and
Tone is kind of putting yourself in the user or the
customer’s shoes and trying to understand how they
feel before you create any kind of content. So one way that I do that is by
breaking down our content types and trying to identify the
sort of emotional states and emotions that I associate
with each of those content types. And then that guides me to kind
of strike the right tone, to keep humor out of really
serious content and to be a little more playful when
people are in a better frame of mind. Learned a ton. And that’s saying something. Because I’ve had quite a bit of
experience under my belt. But the fact is there
are thousands of great ideas out there. And it’s great to see the
pool of talent that we have here in Michigan. Believe me, there are 20 other
people in that room, maybe more, who could get up and
tell us more about the wonderful things that
they’re doing. And it’s great to see them all
in one place and sharing their experience. So it was wonderful. The thing that happened after
my talk is people kept tweeting, did you think
about this? Have you thought about that? I’m making a list, folks. And I’m going to act
on all of them. Because I do need to actually
find some of those solutions I was talking about. So what a great venue. What I got out of today was a
lot of new concepts of how we can approach the content as well
as the user interface to make it more suitable
for users. The one thing I walked away
with– and I say this hesitantly because I don’t want
it to look poorly on my company– is we’re not in
a position right now to implement some of
these things. What it sparked is a lot of
thoughts about how we do implement these concepts, how we
kind of rethink the project process so that we can go and
bring some of these new concepts in at the beginning
of project versus trying to program them in at the
end of a project. I think the response
has been great, actually, to this event. And I felt the passion for the
event from the Detroiters that attended today. And I think that they really
see and appreciate an organization like UX coming to
Detroit and to having this here locally. There’s a lot going on in
Detroit today in terms of, you know, the start-up community,the
tech community, advertising. There’s a place for UX here. And you could see that by
the number of people that attended today. So, you know, I think this is
the right kind of thing to be doing in Detroit. And I imagine the more we do it,
the more involved people are going to get. Today was amazing. It was really great to be here
and be part of this event. I think it’s a really cool thing
for Michigan to have these kinds of events happening
in the state and to be building this momentum
in the UX community. I’m from the west side
of the state. But I’m really– it’s been great to be here in
Detroit and connect with a bunch of my colleagues here in
Detroit and see sort of an emergence of the tech community
here in Michigan. And it’s been great to
be a part of this. I’m really impressed with how
good of a turnout we had and how many people are just so
happy with all the speakers and what they’ve learned and
what they’ve gotten out of it and how many people want to
see another one and just enjoying themselves
in general. And the networking out
of it has been great. UX in Detroit is not a– it’s
not like a– it’s not synonymous when you think about
Detroit and what are the industries and what are
people doing here. I don’t know that UX comes up
to the top of the list. So I think there is a sense in
there that this thing that we’re all passionate about, that
it’s going to be a thing if it isn’t already a thing.

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