the Venerable Pomnyun: “Toward happiness and freedom in your life” | Talks at Google


[PIANO MUSIC PLAYING] [SPEAKING KOREAN] [SPEAKING KOREAN] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
regardless of topic, let’s just engage in a dialogue. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s good? MALE SPEAKER:
Afternoon, my friends. Pomnyun Sunim is
no ordinary monk. He’s the winner of
the Magsaysay Award, which is Asia’s
Nobel Peace Prize. He was one of the
very first people to organize food aid for
North Korea back in the 1990s. Yeah, back when
even I was young. His deep engagement
with North Koreans have made him one of the world’s
top experts on North Korea. He is a popular zen teacher
and he’s a widely respected international
humanitarian leader. Venerable Pomnyun
Sunim is the chairman of the Peace
Foundation in Seoul, which supports policy
research and analysis aimed at Korean unification–
peaceful unification– and humanitarian
issues in North Korea. He is also a Zen master with
the Seoul-based Jungto Society, which he originally established
in 1988 to facilitate self improvement through
volunteerism. And overall, he’s
just a cool dude. And my friends, please welcome
the Venerable Pomnyun Sunim. Sunim, thank you so
much for being here. We’re so honored to have you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Thank you for
inviting me to this event. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And it’s
great to see you all today. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You
must be all busy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So is it OK
for you to be here and waste your time like this? [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: They
get paid to sit here. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So they
don’t have to do anything. You still pay them? MALE SPEAKER: Yes. Well, I get paid
to sit with you. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I think
I need to thank you all first here at Google. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because of you,
I derive a lot of benefits. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I travel
all over the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I especially
travel to those areas that are less travelled. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because you allow
a free use of the Google Maps, I tend to use it very often. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Thank you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But there is
also not so good things. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
I travel often, I should know my way
around fairly well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I should
know every nooks and crannies in Seoul. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if I were
to quit from being a monk, I would have been made
an excellent taxi driver. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But right now,
my talents are now wasted. It’s useless anymore. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
the GPS actually knows the roads a
lot better than I do. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So another
matter to thank you about– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –is YouTube. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So my dialogues,
engagement with folks, the video clips of those
are on the YouTube. And that allows
Koreans communities across the world to be able
to speak with me vicariously. And that made it easy for
me to engage with them. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Before,
our engagement was limited by time and space
and limited to areas like this, spaces like this. But now our engagement has been
freed from that limitation. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
this is also free. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So thank
you doubly for that. MALE SPEAKER: So Sunim,
I am aware that you’re on a world tour. You are touring, you’re
giving 115 lectures in 115 cities in 115 days. And Mountain View is
lecture number 79. And tonight you’re
going to Oakland, and they’ll be lecture 80. Young people like
him, lots of energy. Not old people like me. So, my dear friend, your
world tour– what do you hope to achieve in doing this? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: There’s no specific
thing I’m trying to achieve. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So a lot of people
suffer in their everyday lives. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To listen to them– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and
to engage with them. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
I feel fulfilled when I see their
suffering alleviated even by a small amount. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because they
see me first through YouTube. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And they want
to engage with me directly in person. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And they also
want to ask questions of me. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
I have been asked to come visit them many times. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But seeing
how Buddhist monks should be fairly not
busy, but I’m always busy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I
didn’t have time before, but this time I
actually made time in order to travel through
the world and meet with them. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Second,
because I only speak Korean, until now I was able to
engage with Koreans only. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
I were to be reborn in the next lifetime
speaking English, then I’ll be able to engage
with English speakers and other global
citizens, as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I’m actually
practicing for my next lifetime by doing this world tour. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s
an investment, per se. MALE SPEAKER: You do recognize
when you get reborn, you sort of forget some English? He’s going, oops. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So no one has
proved that yet, so we’ll see. MALE SPEAKER: So you
will get a chance to ask Sunim some questions. We will leave plenty of time. So I only have a few
questions, and then we’ll give you plenty of time. So Sunim, I have to ask
you about North Korea because you’re one of
the world’s top experts on the topic. And I’m just going to ask you
a very broad question, which is, talk about peace
and humanitarian issues in North Korea today. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when you
say North Korea, images of dictatorship, nuclear,
and human rights violations. Those are the images
that come to your mind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we don’t often
think that there are actually 20 million people living there. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And they are
suffering as we speak. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They lack food. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They lack medicine. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They lack water. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They lack a
lot of essential goods. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They
don’t have electricity. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They
don’t have anything to burn for heat during winter. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
we only focus on the bad actions
perpetrated by the leadership, we forget about the 20 million
people who suffer under them. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I want to focus
on the 20 million people who are suffering and think
about their suffering. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
they have the right to ask for help as
part of the human race. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And that’s
what I seek to do. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So many of them,
some of them actually cross the river into China because
they cannot suffer anymore. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
they are refugees. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Of course
China considers them as illegal aliens
and repatriates them to North Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s a
little dangerous for you to actually actively help
North Korean refugees in China. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But they also
have the right to be protected. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And so that’s why
I give them support when I can. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And human rights
is also very bad in North Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
it’s very difficult to find a way to
alleviate, improve that situation in North Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we do have
consistent and constant awareness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
collect information about the sufferings and let
the international community know about them. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
they have the right to live as human beings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Not to criticize
the North Korean regime, but to give North Korean
people the opportunity to live as human beings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But this
is not an easy work. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
currently there is a great tension between
North and South Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So North
Korea is the enemy from South Korean perspective. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we ignore
the people’s plight, their diseases,
their lack of food. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
since North Korea’s also at odds with
the United States. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
from my perspective, the US is not really
keeping in principle to their humanitarian
principles when it comes to dealing
with North Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
improvements in human rights situation and
humanitarian aid, I think, can only really be improved
once the tension surrounding the Korean peninsula
can be relaxed a little. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So no
matter how feeble it might be, I do
my best in order to aid to the cause of peace
on the Korean peninsula. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To go to peace. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The first step
in the road to peace is first, you have to acknowledge the
difference between you and me. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And second,
try to understand that the other might act
that way for a reason. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But today,
just because others do not think the way we do– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –we actually
paint them into a corner, saying label them as
beast, as Satan, as evil. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if
you listen to them, they also think similarly about
South Korea and the United States. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why it’s
difficult, the road to peace. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
well first we have to lay the foundation
of mutual understanding and acknowledgement of
each other’s differences in order to arrive
at lasting peace. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But that path is
strewn with misunderstandings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
you claim that we need to acknowledge
our differences, understand their
point of view, people say you are trying
to sympathize. You are trying to
take their side. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I
try to do what’s best and what’s good to
me in my thoughts, but I get criticized
from both sides. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So perhaps that’s
why I live such a long life. [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: So Sunim, are
you hopeful about world peace? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I think it’s
going to take some time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
even just a century ago– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we usually
lived our lives in the community that we are born in. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: With
the same ethnicity. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: With
the same religion. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: With
the same culture. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that
led us to thinking that we are always right. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But now
we are all intermixed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And you
have that tension. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it
takes some time for us to develop the capacity
to understand each other, acknowledge each
other’s differences. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I think
we are improving. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So after
a century or so– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –I believe that
we can live together in harmony on the basis of acknowledgment
of each other’s differences and understanding
of the differences. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s
not anything else that becomes a
source of conflict. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
differences will actually be appreciated for bringing
about enrichment to our lives, rather than being a
source of conflict. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
for example, there are different flowers
within the same pot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Different shapes. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Different colors. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Different sizes. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But see, they
come together to create beauty. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that’s the
world that I’m dreaming about. MALE SPEAKER: So
is there anything that Googlers and Google can
help you or help world peace? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s important
for Google, as a corporation, to abide by its fiduciaries to
pursue profit at the same time. For example, allowing all of
us to use Google Maps for free. If you could allow us a lot
of spaces, a lot of areas, a lot of functions that we
could also use in common, I think that’s a
great contribution. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Does that mean
that you won’t get paid? [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there’s
a traditional saying that if you create a
lot of good blessings, then you will get the
blessings in return. I think you are actually
investing a lot of blessing for your own fortune
in the future. MALE SPEAKER: Now, don’t
be shy to ask any time. I have one more question
before I open the floor. So this time I’m going
to shift the focus to something more local. Which is, so the
problem with modern life in a modern society, especially
in the Silicon Valley, is that people feel
overwhelmed all the time. So do you have
any advice for how to address the feeling of
being overwhelmed all the time? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I’m
not sure, actually. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because everything
is becoming faster and faster. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there’s a
saying in Buddhist sacred text. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Say for example,
a rabbit was taking a nap, then it was alerted, woke up. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It almost felt
like the sky was falling and the earth was shaking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
it started running. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
on the [INAUDIBLE] a deer was asking the rabbit,
where are you running? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And the rabbit
said, the sky’s falling. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And the
deer asked, really? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And so the
deer followed the rabbit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you know, the
deer wasn’t convinced at first, but he started
following the rabbit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And other deers. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So all the
animals in the forest, you know, they actually competed
each other, raced each other. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: One might
be ahead of each other, but they traded places. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
everybody thought they needed to run away as
soon as possible, as quickly as possible to live. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But a tall
cliff was waiting for them at the edge of the forest. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: No one knew about
the existence of the cliff. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So they say, a lion
is watching this from above, and roared. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So all the
animals were frightened and they stopped. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So he asked the
cow, where are you going? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And the
cow said, I don’t know. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why
were you running? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
the horse was running. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To the horse,
why are you running? He said he didn’t know, either. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why
were you running? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
the sheep was running. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So he
asked all the animals. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: He found the
original runner, the rabbit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: He said, why did
you run in the first place? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because I
saw the sky was falling and the Earth shaking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: He said,
did you really see it? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So let’s go back to
that place where you saw this. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They
go back to the place where the rabbit
was having a nap. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So he was
sleeping under an acorn tree. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when an
acorn fell next to him while he was taking a nap,
that’s what frightened him. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So they said this
was a happening, of sorts. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So perhaps that
explains where we are today. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we are always
racing, but where are we going? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I want to ask
you back the same question. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The
reason for you to run. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Is it because
of the money you get paid? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Is it
because you have to contribute to growing Google? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Is it really? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why do you
have to run so fast? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I think it’s time
for us to kind of review that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And to
tell you this first– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And one more– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It is greed that
actually leads to anxiety. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Just because
you want to run fast doesn’t necessarily
mean you run fast. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we
always want to run fast. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But our
bodies do not agree. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
it’s so tough on us. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
it’s important for us to kind of stabilize our mind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER:
Instead of being too obsessed over
wanting to run fast. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And start
thinking, growing the capacity to run fast. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But you
know, in modern world, we usually want
to run fast first. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why we feel anxious. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
we feel nervous. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And we
always are worried that somebody else
is running faster. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And I
think type of anxiety we are fully capable
of overcoming. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I just wanted
to speak to you about that. MALE SPEAKER: So the moral of
the story is steel the mind and never trust
a talking rabbit. [LAUGHTER] OK, questions from the audience. There’s on there. There’s one over here. This lady. AUDIENCE: Hi. One of my favorite
modern philosophers said that the three most
dangerous human addictions today are heroin, carbohydrates,
and a monthly salary. His name is Nassim Taleb. He’s Doctor Doom. So my question to you is most
of us here have at least two out of those three addictions,
definitely the monthly salary. And every day I ask
myself the question of what is the
purpose of humans? So as a human, what
should be a noble purpose that should pursue? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do we
need to have a purpose? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do
you think that you need a purpose in your life? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Does a
squirrel have a purpose? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do
deers in the hills, do they have a purpose
in their lives? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They just live. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So human beings
are not that different. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So meanings,
or sense of purpose, is an artifact
created by our mind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So basically you
create the sense of purpose that you created,
and then you are imprisoned by the
sense of purpose. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
need to actually gain an insight into that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you have to be
able to look into your mind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
even though you might not have a specific purpose– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –if you just
start living out your days– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –while
you are living– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –how do you live? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you
observe people– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They live in
the midst of suffering. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They live in the
midst of anxiety, nervousness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They
live under stress. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
then there are those who actually live freer and
happier than the rest of us. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So a lot
of people think this– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That if
you have a lot of money, you’ll be freer and happier. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you
have a high status, you’ll be more free and happier. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It
almost looks that way. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But then is
people with a lot of money and high position, are they
really freer and happier? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I don’t
know how many people you’ve encountered in your life so far. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But I have
met a lot of those people. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But they
don’t seem so happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They
don’t seem so free. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: In a way, they
are even more chased by things. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So what do
we have to do in order to be more authentically
happy and free? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
answers to those questions we can always explore. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you look
at how our minds operate– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –say
this is the stage. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Say this is a
discotheque, a night club. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example, you
have the dancers, the audience of people who paid $100 a person
to come and dance in this club. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then
there are the dancers that the club hires at $1,000
a night to actually dance on the stage. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So they all
dance to the same music. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But the people
who paid $100 to dance, they’re having fun. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But the dancers
on the stage, they’re working. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the people below
stage are enjoying themselves. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
say extended club hours by 30 minutes– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –the people
below stage, they love it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The dancers on
the stage, they want overtime. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why
such phenomenon? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They’re doing
the same exact things. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So why is it
that people below stage are having fun? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And why is it
that the dancers on the stage are working? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the only
difference is money. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
you pay, you have fun. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you take
money, then you’re working. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you’re
all getting paid, right? [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that’s
why you’re working. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
I’m not getting paid. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I actually
have fun every single day. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
how your mind operates. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So being
free from labor– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
being free from labor is not a matter of you getting
paid a lot for a short time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s for you
to enjoy, or make fun, out of your labor. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
how do you do that? How do you transform
labor into fun? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That
means that you have to become the agent
of your own actions. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when
you pay money to dance, the money is not the purpose. You having fun is the purpose. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if
you get paid to dance, then dancing is not the purpose. The money is the purpose. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
are actually selling your professional dancing
abilities for money. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then you become
enslaved to that transaction. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why it’s tough. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
look at those principles that move our minds– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then you are
able to diagnose at what areas and what times
you feel happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: We
usually think that we feel we are pleased
when we receive help– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –but
that’s not so. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
that actually is a path to enslaving yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I
encourage you to examine how your mind operates– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –so
that you can actually bring more enjoyment
or fun to your work. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And to
your life, as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s not
important whether you die today or the next day. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because you need
to be happy today in order to make your next
life happy, as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So no one can
prove that the next life exists or not, of course. MALE SPEAKER: If it exists,
you’ll speak English. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do you have
any follow up questions? MALE SPEAKER: Sunim,
that’s a beautiful answer. Oh by the way, I
do have an answer for that question, what
is the meaning of life. The meaning of life is not. [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: Next question. AUDIENCE: Hi. I agree many of our sufferings
are really due to our mind. But this year seems– this
year has been especially complicated or hard
to swallow for me. I mean, early this year starting
with the Ukraine crisis, and then the conflicts
in the Middle East. We have this Ebola
outbreak and whatnot. I feel as if the
entire universe is kind of inching towards
the end, or so to speak. And we’re closing to the
autumn of the universe. What’s going on this year? Is this thing going to continue? What’s your opinion? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So these
problems always exist. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: From
a long time ago. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And they
will always exist. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
world is not so complex. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
world becomes complex if you lack the capacity
to understand it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The karmas by
which you understand the world– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –was
created a long time ago. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But the
world has changed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
we are still trying to analyze the world through
that karmic paradigm. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
it’s very, very difficult for us to analyze
it, understand it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
it makes it complex. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
mistake I make– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –think that
the world itself is complex. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that’s
why you need a new lens by which to analyze the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So Ebola,
it’s not a huge deal. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: There’s a lot
of fear involved in the US. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It is the
fear that’s a huge deal. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
even ISIS, that’s the same kind of
reactionary methods that a weak, actually
a weak state, actually usually
expresses itself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because if you’re
actually strong and confident, you don’t engage in such terror. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It is a method
of expression usually reserved for the weak who are enraged. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So how
do you deal with it? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If
you actually speak to the source of their anger,
it becomes easy to deal with it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if you
try to suppress them– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –you might
be able to stop it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –but
it will continue. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
throughout history, you’ve seen that happening. Unless you manage to kill
off every single one, it’ll continue. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we
can’t do that today. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because we
don’t allow ourselves to kill others who
are bystanders. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
we need a new method of dealing with such phenomena. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
when nation states are in conflict
with each other– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –we can’t
solve their problem with the same method. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we need a new
way to approach such problems, but we are always attached
to methodologies of the past. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
from my perspective, I think we lack an understanding
of the human psyche. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why
they act that way. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It looks
ridiculous and horrible from our perspective. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we
need to try to explore why they feel as if they have
to behave in such a manner. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s not
a huge problem, per se. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But it’s a
problem that we need to solve. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then we need
to explore solutions. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
the strong can’t compromise with the weak– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then that is
called embracing the weak. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And it’s
spoken in a positive manner. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if the
weak have to compromise– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then they
say the weak capitulate. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And that is
not a good sounding word. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why if
you force them to capitulate, they’ll look for the next
opportunity to rebel. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that
kind of methodology brings about a temporary lull,
but not a permanent peace. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why the
strong needs to do something. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. There’s a question here. AUDIENCE: I’ve heard that
in some Buddhist traditions, women are treated differently. For instance, I’ve heard that
in order to become a Buddha, a woman must first be
reincarnated as a man. What do you feel about this? What is your opinion? Do you agree? Do you think this is antiquated? I’m curious. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
there’s a difference between Buddhist
Dharma and Buddhism. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] MALE SPEAKER: Define dharma. Dharma means teaching, right? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when
I speak of dharma, it speaks to the teaching of
the truth as spoken by Buddha. When I say Buddhism, I speak
more of the cultural artifacts that surround the Buddhism. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when
Buddha was alive, there was a great
discrimination based on gender, as well as based on the caste. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But Buddha thought
that you can’t discriminate between humans based
on their caste. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when a person
wanted to become a monk, he received them
without restrictions. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there were a
lot of members from the lowest caste among his sanga, his
original community of monks. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And he
taught that there are four types of
rivers in this world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But they all become
one sea when they flow out. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So likewise,
there are four different castes in this world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But within my
teachings, there’s only one. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And he allowed
for women to become a convert. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And there
was a great opposition to that at that time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
at that time, women were not considered
fully human beings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
at that time, women were not considered
capable of becoming holy human beings by themselves. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because they had
to be somebody’s daughter when they were young. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And they
had to be somebody’s wife when they were married. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And when
the husband died, they had to remain
as somebody’s mother. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So they were
always labeled in attachment to some male. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But for a woman
to actually convert and enter into the community– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then you are
allowing them, in effect, to own themselves. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
acknowledging that they are one independent, self
sufficient human being. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And he allowed that
while he was alive in that era. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
after 300, 400 years– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –that
practice disappeared. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
Buddhism was dyed by the originals, India’s
traditional ideologies. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So in the
original ideology of India, there are five things that
women can never become. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They can
never be a wise king. She can never be a wise king– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –could
never be a Buddha– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –could
never be [INAUDIBLE]. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –cannot become
one of the kings of one of the heavens– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and
cannot become a Brahmin. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And so that
traditional Indian belief system entered into Buddhism. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And according
to that tradition, women cannot become a Buddha. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then they
said, therefor women do not need to become a monk. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So just do a
good deeds in this lifetime– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and
be reborn as a man. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And then try
to become a Buddha, then. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But that’s
not Buddhist teachings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But in the
historical evolution of Buddhism as an institution,
that actually has taken root. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And it is part
of the Theravada tradition of Buddhism, but it is not part
of Buddha’s original teaching. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
it is true that we have to recognize that in
today, in our current reality, there is discrimination
in Buddhism against women. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
instead of labeling them as Buddhism is
actually a lingering artifact from a feudal
society that we lived in. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And it is Buddhism
that actually has accepted, been corrupted by
that tradition. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
that discrimination, we can say it is part of a
Buddhist cultural tradition, but you can’t say it is part
of Buddha’s original Dharma teaching. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do you have
any follow up questions? AUDIENCE: Thank you. That was amazing. MALE SPEAKER: You
know the Dalai Lama had a commentary
on that question? The Dalai Lama said,
he said his next life, he wants to be
reborn as a woman. So maybe there’s a
suggestion for you. Maybe you can be
reborn as a woman, too. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So Buddha said
the difference between genders, label such as men and women, is
an illusion, is seeing things. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It is just a
preconception that you hold. AUDIENCE: I went to the trip
with [INAUDIBLE] over here in 2008 to China and North
Korea, border of North Korea. And climbing the
mountains of [INAUDIBLE] was very informative
and very nice. But the thing was that one
of the most memorable moments is when looking at the
North Korean border, all the trees were chopped off. Every single trees. There were no trees
in the mountains. And also seeing aid from
China getting rejected and coming back from the North
Korean border back to China. And so my question is, that
was when Kim Jong Il was still in dictatorship. So is the treatment of
civilians much better now that Kim Jong
Un is in state? Or even reunification? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we are
not able to discover any concrete improvements
over the human rights situation in North Korea. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And I
can’t say that there has been any
concrete improvement in the lives of everyday people. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
say people do say that’s Pyungyang,
the city itself, has become a little livelier. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
it’s in a way so we can see that the market
economy has expanded somewhat. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And the amount
of private ownership that are recognized
has also expanded. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So even
the collective farm has been divided. Not to individuals, per
se, but to smaller units, to family units. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And small firms
has been also transformed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there has been
a lot of changes on the line. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But in terms
of politics and military, there has been no change. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we
still see no evidence that the quality of life
has improved for people. AUDIENCE: In your first answer
that was a really beautiful, you talked about the importance
of the how instead of the what. And I was wondering as people
try to go down this path and look more inwards,
how do you advise them in terms of spending
their time inwards. Maybe people come to you
for the monastic tradition. How do you advise people
of sort of the career or the worldly life versus
more of an inward life? Do you have any advice? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
go out to the hill, if you see rabbits and
squirrels, you see them living. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if human
beings are supposedly better than the other
animals, then there’s no reason why we
shouldn’t live better. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Have you ever
seen a rabbit suffering? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Have you ever
seen them commit suicide? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Have you ever seen
them turn jealous and envious? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: They just live. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
at the same time, I’m not saying that they live
very enjoyable lives as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I believe
that as human beings, we should live at least
as well as animals. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we don’t have
to live super enjoyable lives. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we should
not subject our lives to one of suffering, either. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So suffering really
arises not out of some survival need, but it comes
from our mind itself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
the fact is that it is possible to resolve the
source of your suffering if you spend enough
effort to explore it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Of
course, institution could be changed or
improved to help us do that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
the needs of an animal are survival needs, basic needs. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
if they’re hungry, when they eat their full,
then the need disappears. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But not
with human beings. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I think to be
able to eat when you’re hungry, I think that’s one of
our basic human rights. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
as institutions, we need to guarantee that right. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But to eat
better, richer food– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –to live
in a bigger house– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: There’s
no end to that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I think those
kind of relative desires you need to moderate. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there
are two solutions. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: From a so social
infrastructure point of view– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –to
lessen the distance between the rich and poor. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
a sense of poverty is a relative term
compared to the rich. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But as
individuals, it’s up to us to be able to
moderate our desires. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To let
go of your greed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So this
conversation could really last a long time, so I
just want to conclude by saying that it is possible,
fully possible, for you to just make a little effort to
examine yourself and alleviate your source of suffering. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So as
employees of Google, what is it that’s
causing your suffering? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You’re
living in the richest country in the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
you are employed by the best company in the
richest country in the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
you are the object of envy for the
rest of the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If
you are suffering– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then the rest of
us have no option but despair. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: What are
we supposed to do, then? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if we go on
the way we do now, then– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –we believe
that heaven is a good place. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you
actually get there. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
they are probably suffering, as well, then. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why we need
to kind of examine ourselves. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So for you to
live a little happier lives– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –it’s good
for you as individuals. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But it is also
very important for the rest of humanity. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
could expand your heart to help others a little bit– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and
you will amplify your sense of happiness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And really
improve the lives of others around the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you continue
just running straight ahead– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –you don’t
know whether you’re running into a cliff. AUDIENCE: So I’m
not sure if you’re suggesting that happiness
is sort of the state that we should
ideally be seeking. But if it is, I
think to the people that I know who
are the happiest, and they’re actually the
people that are most selfish. And I observe that they’re
very happy because they spend– you know, all of our time
and energy are limited. And they spend that
time and energy on their own goals and
their own interests, and they don’t
really help others. And that doesn’t seem to
be the ideal way of living. The ideal way of
living seems to be some sort of balance between
seeking your own happiness, and also seeking
others’ happiness. On the other end
of the spectrum, I see other people
who are very selfless and help a lot of
people selflessly, but actually because they’re so
neglectful of their own needs, they’re unhappy. So it seems like we need
some sort of balance, right? How would you suggest striking
an appropriate balance between addressing
other people’s needs and increasing other
people’s happiness, and our own happiness? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example, I’m
carrying this heavy burden. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I look
down at the ground because this thing I’m
carrying is too heavy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I have no
idea what others are carrying, how heavy their burdens are. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
even if I knew it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –I have no
capacity to help them carry it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But for example,
if I let go of more burden– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then I
can actually look around. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then I can
actually see other people carrying their burdens, as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And then
now I have capacity to help them if I wanted to. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why first, you need to be happy
first and foremost. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But by saying
you need to be happy, I’m not saying only
you need to be happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: First and
foremost, you need to be happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then,
you have that capacity to help others be happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you think
you’re sacrificing for others– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –that’s
not sustainable. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because we
have limits to our patience. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: At some point
in time, you will explode. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: However for
you to benefit selfishly while causing loss to others,
that’s not sustainable, either. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because then
the people who suffer loss, they won’t be still. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
it’s not sustainable. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But for a sense of
happiness to be sustainable– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –you have to
achieve a state in which it’s good for me and good for you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So a temporary
state of happiness is not real happiness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s enjoyment. Perhaps pleasure. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But that enjoyment
needs to be sustainable. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And we can
define that as happiness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To achieve that
state, it has to be good for me and good for you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And that’s the
beginning, starting gate. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The starting gate
should be you should be happy yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And so even
when you help others, you must be happy
yourself helping others. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So when
you love others, it must cause
happiness within you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if helping
others causes you suffering, then it’s not a good way. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
then you want some kind of
compensation in return. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So in
that, you actually cause a seed– you
actually create enemies by helping with a
sense of compensation. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
have to recognize that helping others is actually
a way to make yourself happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that, I don’t
think, is self centeredness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
I believe that trying to create a happier
world, the first step starts with your own happiness. MALE SPEAKER: The happiest
people I’ve never met are all people with no hair. So there’s an
inverse correlation between hair and happiness. [LAUGHTER] POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So for us to
shave our heads actually signifies that we
are very simple. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because if you have
too much thoughts in your head, then that automatically
results in a heavier heart. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
I’m just urging you to be a little light
headed in your thoughts. [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: OK,
maybe this gentlemen and then if there’s
still a question, we can come back to you. AUDIENCE: Thank you for
your great teachings today. I’d like to ask the question
about like the ones related to the question about
the world itself. So you said in your
answer, you said like we have a lot of
problems in the world, but it has been like
that for a long time. But if you look at the companies
around the Silicon Valley, we see a lot of business like,
make the world a better place. Stuff like that. Do you think with this
technology and innovation, are we getting to a
better place as a world? I’d like to know your
opinions on the meanings of this innovation and
technology in our lives. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I’m not sure. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you use
technology for a good cause, then it will become
a better world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And if you
use it for a bad cause, you’ll create a worse world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
technology in itself is not efficient to
create a better world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
we need people who are willing to use
the technologies to the betterment of the world. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because a better
weapon kills more people. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So a sharper knife
can be used very effectively for other things,
but it could also be used as a better weapon. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s not a
problem of the technology, for example, a
sharper knife itself. It’s a problem of who wields it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because right
now, all you are focused on is creating a
sharper, better knife. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
might think that it’s up to the people, whoever they
are, to use it to their end. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
I don’t think so. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I think
it’s part of your job to prepare people to be able to
use your technology to better ends. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because you need
to actually set the example, exemplify how you could use
your technology to better ends so that people can
follow your lead. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because if
you use your technology for enrichment of
individuals, or in bad ways, then people will follow
those examples, as well. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I’m here
today partially related to that issue. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That you
yourself need to be happy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
to encourage you to take an interest in
how your technology can be used in good ways. MALE SPEAKER: Any questions? OK, back to the lady. AUDIENCE: Let’s say,
OK, I have a loved one and there was a
misunderstanding. And there have been
many, many years where I’ve tried to clear up
the misunderstanding and it just hasn’t cleared up. So it’s been difficult for me. And the question is, until
when do I keep on trying. Or do I just, for my own
emotional lightness of being, just sever the
relationship and move on? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So why do you
think it’s a misunderstanding? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s
a misunderstanding from your perspective. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Maybe
from his perspective, it’s not a misunderstanding. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you need
to examine that first. AUDIENCE: Well, I guess
to be more open and honest about this– so I
tried to explain as clear as possible
my true intention and the loved one is saying
that that’s not true. So refuses to accept
what I’m saying. And then I don’t
know where to go. Because I feel like I’ve
been fully honest and open, but the loved one
will not believe me. And accuses a
different intention. I don’t know where to go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the
key to the situation is the fact that
you believe that he has a misunderstanding
that you want to continue the relationship. AUDIENCE: Well I guess it’s
a loved one, it’s a relative, and so I’d like to keep the
relationship going and strong. But again, I’m trying to
be honest with how I feel and my intentions, but the loved
one says that that’s not true. So keeps on saying,
suggesting that I’m lying or misrepresenting how I really
feel, when I’m being honest. So that’s my challenge. Do I keep on trying to
persuade with the truth which that person won’t
accept, or do I somehow just try and
forget the person and leave and just kind
of sever the relationship and try and forget
that person completely? But it’s difficult for
me, because that person is obviously a loved
one and I would like to improve the relationship
instead of run away. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I
do understand you wanting to improve
the relationship, but you have to face the
fact that it’s not improving. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
can’t really get everything you
want in this life. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
you can try more– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –or you can stop. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
you stop now, you feel maybe you didn’t
try hard enough. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
if you try harder, it’s not going to be
easy to resolve, either. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But instead
of looking to him, look at yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But ultimately,
the essence of the problem is you don’t want to be
criticized or misunderstood. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Let’s say he
did have a misunderstanding. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then he was hurt
by that misunderstanding. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So, well,
let him insult you. Let him curse at you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
accept it willingly. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Instead
of criticizing him– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –allow him
to insult you even more. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if
you think that’s going to help him overcome his anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then go
ahead, insult me more. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So be
lighthearted in your approach. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then you
won’t feel such impatience at resolving this situation. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If he
avoids you, then there’s nothing you can do. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But you have
no reason to avoid him. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
you’re already prepared to take whatever
he throws at you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then you free
yourself from the result, whether the situation
improves or not. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
you can’t always have people praising you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because even
Buddha was criticized. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And Jesus was
misunderstood and crucified. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So even those
sages were criticized. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
people like us, it’s no big deal for us to be
insulted and criticized. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So be
willing to accept that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then it’s OK. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: First and foremost,
you have to open yourself up. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Instead of
trying to resolve something– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –just understand
that he does have a scar. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And just encourage
him to criticize you even more. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And be
receptive to all that. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And if
you have that attitude, then nothing is an issue. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: What do you think? AUDIENCE: [SPEAKING KOREAN] AUDIENCE: You said
that to be happy, we have to remove
our greediness. It sounds very simple,
but in practice it’s very difficult to
remove our greediness. So can you suggest how can
we practice in our life to remove our greediness? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: An
option is for you to hold on to your
greediness and suffer. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if
you suffer enough, if the suffering is severe
enough, then you will let go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example,
let’s say this object is hot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if I grab it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –how do I react? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then I let go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if I’m
holding on to this hot object– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and I say I’m
suffering because this is hot, this is hot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And so
I say, let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then he says– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –give
me a way to let it go. Teach me a methodology
to let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So is it because
of a lack of methodology that you don’t let go? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: No. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s because
your greed is on holding it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
do want to hold onto it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then
burn yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if you
don’t want to burn yourself– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –just let go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s not
an issue of methodology. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
that’s what we teach. If you know that
it’s hot, let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And just let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So basically it
means in Chinese characters, just let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then people
still keep asking questions. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Please teach
me a way to let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So that’s
why as a last option, I tell them then throw
it to your left hand. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
so they yell at me, why didn’t you teach me sooner? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because I just
solved how hot it was– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and then I
still keep holding on to it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it
looks like a solution. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then eventually
your left hand gets hot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then he
keeps complaining, my left hand is hot. So I said, put it on your thigh. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So he said wow,
that’s a great solution. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
neither of my hands are hot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: I still
hold on to the bottle. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But then again,
your knees become hot. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So after
five such steps– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you
finally let it go– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –is
that a good way? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: These
were nonessential ways, useless ways. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
that’s why you have to go to the core
of the problem. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
it’s not the matter of not knowing the
right methodology. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You just
don’t want to let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
you say you suffer, but you don’t want to let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
then you have to be able to deal with the suffering. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Why do we live? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Do we
live to suffer, though? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If that’s not it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then
you have to let it go. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I do understand
how difficult this is. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To a smoker– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –how does
a smoker quit smoking? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
my answer is easy. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Stop smoking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
everybody understands it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
there’s one who doesn’t. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The smoker
does not understand it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: He says,
how can I stop smoking? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
by that question, he’s actually implying that
he wants to continue smoking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: His
consciousness is telling him that he should stop smoking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
his subconsciousness wants to continue smoking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it’s a habit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Habits are
difficult to get rid of. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you have to
choose two options, then. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So provide
a strong anti stimulus. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: A
stimulus strong enough to delve and reach down
into your subconscious. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For
example, say you put some kind of
electronics on your filter. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it
gives you shock– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –every time you
smoke, you put it to your lips. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s strong
enough for you to faint. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you repeat
this several times– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then it
is your subconscious that develops a fear,
an aversion to smoking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there’s
a way to do that by using that kind of
strong anti stimulus. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example, if
you want to control your anger management, it’s very difficult. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If you really,
really want to fix it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –every
time you become angry– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –so take some car
batteries and shock yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You
do it just 5 times. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then
the next time you feel yourself getting
angry, your body will react and start shaking. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But is there
really a need for you to go that far to fix a habit? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
you end up not fixing it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But the
second solution is– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –to
actually do this over a long time, consistently. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
whatever choice you make, whatever
decision you make, consciously you have to
train yourself to carry it on consistently over
a long period of time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Until
that state of conscious affects your subconscious. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
repeat something long enough, it becomes a habit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: If something
becomes a habit, it means you have made it into
part of your subconscious. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The same thing
as the law of physics. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there are
properties to objects. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we all know
about the law of inertia. Anything that’s in movement
want to continue moving. Anything that stops wants
to continue stopping. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: We all
know this, right? In physics? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example,
this is moving towards me. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And I
have to stop this. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: There
are only two ways. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Stop it with
a strong force against it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then it’ll stop
after pushing a little bit. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
if you want to use small strength,
force, to stop it– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then it’ll
take a while before it stops. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So there
are only two ways. To use a strong force to stop
in short time, or smaller force to stop over a
long period of time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we don’t
want to use a strong force. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And we
are not consistent. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why we allow our karma to self amplify itself
over and over again. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why you
don’t see any transformation. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And say because you
don’t see the transformation, you say this is unfixable. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: This is something
that I was born with. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
in Chinese tradition, you have the stars. By the date and time you’re born
with, your fortune is fixed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: In
India, your destiny is fixed by what you did
in your previous lifetime. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And in
Western theistic tradition, it’s God who preordained
your destiny. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
change is so difficult, they’re saying that
change does not happen. It’s preordained. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: By that’s not so. Nothing is unchanging. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
a karma is something that has been manufactured. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So as
such, it does change. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But to
change it, however– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –it is difficult. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because it
has been manufactured over a long period of time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The
earlier it was formed, the less change it experiences. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So either do
it forcefully, or do it over a long period of time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: By
doing so, anybody can actually affect change. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we
never actually even try. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: We
just want change. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But we don’t put
the requisite effort behind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Even if we
actually spend a little effort– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –we give up and
say, eh, it’s not worth it. Didn’t happen. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So do it forcefully
over a long period of time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then you can
change, no matter who you are. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So intellectually
understanding this concept, intellectually it is an
activity of the consciousness. So it doesn’t really affect
change fundamentally. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if
your heart, for example, if your heart is moved over
a story that you hear– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then
that makes it easier for you to change
your behaviors. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For your
heart to have moved, that means you have
affected your subconscious. MALE SPEAKER: Sunim, in closing,
if we remember only one thing from today, what do you
want us to remember? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Try to
suppress something. Try to be patient
against something. It’s not a good thing. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: For example,
if you become angry, you express your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then the target
of your anger becomes stressed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And that anger
comes right back at you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then that
amplifies your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you’re
actually mutually amplifying. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It is
a foolish option. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why as a second option, we tell people to
suppress your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So at least you
don’t transfer your anger to the other person. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you stop it
from amplifying the situation. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So from
that sense, that’s a good method from the outside. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And you get
praised for being patient. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But then you
create stress for yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So a lot of
us experience that state. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So
that, ultimately, is not really good for you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we said, don’t
even suppress your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then people
ask, then what can I do? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You tell
me not to get angry– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then
don’t even suppress it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then what to do? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So it
might sound that way. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if you
look at it a little deeper– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –say you feel
this anger rising within you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So then you
have only two options. To express that anger, or
to suppress that anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But if you go back
to the root of that anger– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –you
have to observe the anger originating
within you. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if that
anger never rises– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –then you
don’t have to suppress it, nor express it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why we ask people to go deeper into the roots. Ask yourself, why
do I get angry? POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you
need to delve deeper– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –and become a
person who is not angered. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
we allow ourself to sink into a
state of ignorance. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because anger
rises from the subconscious within us. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And our
conscious does not always catch it in time. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s
why we teach people for your conscious to
be awake at all times. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But
sometimes it escapes us. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So we tell
people to catch your anger, be aware of your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you can
catch your anger and observe it, it doesn’t amplify. It actually reduces in
volume and disappears. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you’re not
trying to suppress it, per se. You’re trying to
become aware of it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: To be awake to it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So you don’t
create stress that way. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But say
you lost that moment. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Say that you
actually expressed your anger. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then we
usually make an excuse that it’s your fault
that I’m angry. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: At that moment,
you have to look at yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: You say,
I lost that moment. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And you have
to kind of review yourself. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then that
anger is not amplified. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
that allows your life to become much more comfortable. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So what I’m
not try to suppress stress. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because
you need to resolve it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So I think
exploding in anger is not a resolution. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
you have to maintain a constant state
of awakefulness. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And for
that, to reach that state, you need practice. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: That’s why
meditation is a good practice. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The
first step is for you to recognize, be
awake to your breath. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And try to
maintain a state of tranquility on your mind. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So of
course it’s easier to maintain that when
you’re sitting down. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But it’s also
difficult to maintain it while you’re actually
encountering people. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: But just because
you fail, it’s not a bad thing. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Because it allows
you to explore why you failed. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And then take
that back to your practice. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then experiment
with it in real life. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Then go
back and practice again. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So if you
put it in that effort– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –where nothing is
going to completely go away– POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: –but
perhaps 80% of it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: It’s very easy to
arrive at a much better state. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: The sense
you are able to create much happier lives
for yourselves. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: Much more
comfortable lives, tranquil lives. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And your
relationship with others will improve. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And from that
space of peace and comfort, you can be much more creative. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: So the final
words I’d like to say to you and ask you to take
back as a take away is, instead of trying to
suppress anything, try to be awake to it. Mindful of it. POMNYUN SUNIM: [SPEAKING KOREAN] INTERPRETER: And
I wish all of you great happiness in your lives. MALE SPEAKER: My friends, the
amazing master Pomnyun Sunim. Thank you. [APPLAUSE]

73 thoughts on “the Venerable Pomnyun: “Toward happiness and freedom in your life” | Talks at Google

  • It is an inspiring and didactic talk that will be able to reach at the hearts of people who are wandering…

    I appreciate Sunim for your lessons full of insights!

  • 마음이 너무 사악한 사람을  만나게  되어서, 충격을 받았을때  어떻게  하나요?   물론 뉴스에서는 항상 슬프고, 놀라는 소식이 많이 있지만.     네,  그리고  사람이라는 것이    들에 핀 들꾳   같다는 것도  잘  알고 있습니다 만. ……  Dear Venerable Pmnnyun,
    when you encounter an evil and vicious person, what shall I do ?   Just regard that is only my thought, the other person doesn't know at all.  Just control my thought,  not to think like that.   Just become aware of the moment of shock. Thank you so much.  Please take good care of your health.  Namaste.

  • 통역하시는분 완벽하시다.
    불법의경지도남다르시고.
    근데
    "허깨비"같은거 캐취못하셔서 스님에게 귀들이대는모습 너무인간적이고 멋있으세요

  • Venerable Pomnyun' method usually doesn't involve giving canned lectures.  It's almost always much more lively, spontaneous, and socratic Q & A.  Depending on the group, demographics, however, you tend to get different questions.  In a small company setting where everyone knows you, people tend to be more reserved as they are less likely to air personal issues and problems – issues with co-workers, boss, office politics, etc.  Hence the more generic questions about world politics, world peace in this group.

  • @ Josh T Lee; how much Korean do you understand, to the way you made comment about the interpretation ?? His interpretation was exactly what the monk said, he did excellent job, you should learn the
    language if you want to comment on stuff that you don't know or understand that is the sign of ignorance in my opinion.

  • 통역하시는 분 한국 사시나요? 진짜 똑똑해 보이네요. 어떻게 저렇게 즉석에서 만들어 내는지. 캬…

  • Thank you, Pomnyun Priest. Thank you GOOgle! Thank you to the gentleman working as on the spot translator! This clip is priceless!

  • 저도 통역을 하는 사람으로서개인적인 생각이지만,짤막하게 끊기는통역이나 동시통역은청중들을 만족스럽게 전달시키기에는 불가능합니다. 그것은 통역의 최대단점이지요.긴내용이 되면 놓치는부분이 발생하게 되고또 답변자 본인도 줄줄줄 이어나가할 이야기 타이밍을 놓쳐버리죠.자동번역소프트와 같은 성질입니다.웬지 부족합니다.법륜스님은 객관적으로 봐서 대단한 분입니다.통역하시는분도 최고급수준임에 틀림없습니다.

  • Im so touched not only by sunim but by his interpreator! He is amazing! He is not equal. I recognized that's the way I do study English.

  • 한국말 이해되시는분은 법륜스님 다른 동영상 봐보세요.. 번역때문에 말이 끊기는게 아쉽네요

  • 통역 정말 잘 하시는 분이 틀림없네요. 법륜스님이 가끔 너무 빨리 말씀하시는 부분, 그리고 한국 속담들만 빼면 아주 정확히, 그리고 섬세한 부분까지 통역하셨네요…

  • Its interesting what the sunim is saying, but i think greed & too much power r strong forces & very hard to overcome no matter how much we wish for our own & the happiness & betterment of others. I think it will be a very long time before there is any real change of the present circumstances in various countries sad to say.

  • 남편이 미국사람이라 한국 언어를 이해못하는데…. 통역 하시는 분이 정말 잘하셔서 너무 감사합니다.
    통역 하시는 분의 성함이 어떻게 되세요?

  • What a gentle wise monk. It was such a pleasure to view this youtube and such gems of wisdom. Thank you.

  • 통역하시는분 엽문 닯았어요!!ㅎㅎ
    한글 영어로 다 받아쳐 내는게 멋있어요!! 무림고수 ㅋㅋ

  • 진행자는  썰렁한 농담 당장 그만두시라  착하게 생겨서  그러시면 진짜 곤란하다

  • Please venerable Pomnyun help us, the torture and slaughter of dogs in south korea is so horrendous, the dogs screaming in pain, hurting, suffering, it is so truly sick and the cruel dog meat trade must end. You are such a loving and amazing person and if you would please talk to your fellow citizens in South korea about compassion and that what is happening with no animal cruelty laws is not right, it causes a innocent dog to scream and hurt, it shows no love to another life. They need to stop. I know they would listen to you because you are so respected and loved. I know you can make a huge difference, i know you would not believe torturing any animal or making them suffer is alright. I know you don't believe in torture to any animal or human being. I beg of you of the lives of the dogs to please reach out to your country, tell them, they must stop, they must treat animals with basic humanity, food, water, kind treatment and never hurt them on purpose, NEVER torture and laugh at them hurting. This is called Boknal in South Korea, where hundreds of thousands of dogs are tortured and slaughtered, please i beg you on the pain of the dogs, reach out to your fellow Koreans and tell them how wrong this is and they need to never intentionally cause pain or suffering to any living being, they i believe will listen, please help us, the dogs need you, to teach more love and kindness, please google the boknal in Korea and you will see how they torture them, it is so horrible, it makes us all want to cry forever. dogs love ppl and all beings need not be tortured or treated cruel, thank you so much, Meghan taylor

  • the world is asking YOU to stand up for the tortured skinned alive, boiled alive dogs in S Korea Dog Meat Trade. Those of us here in a physical body must be the voice of the tortured. It is not enough to talk the talk but we must all walk the talk. Your voice reaches many …….

  • i wish American or all politicians listens to these insights, specially i liked what he said about ISIS, weak and hurted ppl never stop revengeful mind unless they re wiped off, but it got to do from ppl who have more power

  • 통역하시는 분…정말 멋지심……….정말 인재이심~..근데 이연걸 닮으셧네요..중국분같이 생기셨음.ㅋㅋㅋ

  • 저는 법륜스님의 해외강연을 유투브에서 볼 수 있는 것이 너무 좋습니다. 아래분의 의견처럼 통역 너무 잘하십니다. 감사합니다.

  • 헐… 거의 동시통역을 1시간 넘개 하다니….미쳤다.
    그리고 돈주고 듣고싶은 사람이 여기있는데, 거기있는 사람들은 무슨복으로 태어나서 돈받고 듣노… 구글의 직원이 뭐라고. 이런거보면 평범한 자기가 참 서글퍼 이~ 이런게 빈부차이, 인종차이가 생기게 하잖아. 인종차이가 뭐 피부색이니, 서있고 앉아있는 자리의 차이지..

  • 두분 다 너무 대단하시네요. 근데 확실히 스님께서 한국말로 말씀하시고 뒤에 분이 통역하시고 또 말씀하시고 통역하시고 하다보니 한국에서 하실떄 처럼의 분위기는 조금 안나오지만 뭐 어쩔 수 없는 것 같습니다. 세미나 초반에도 법륜스님이 한국사람 하고만 교감을 하고 있다 라고 하신것도 있고.. 저 통역사 분은 한국분도 아니신데 그럼 3개국어( 한국어 영어+ 자기 모국어)를 하시는 모양인데 대단하십니다.

  • 스님께서도 통역하기 좋게
    짧은 문장으로 말씀하신다 들었는데..
    정말 절묘하게 통역하시는 분과 합이 잘 맞네요!
    통역하시는 분도 귀하게 마음으로 함께 해주셔서
    멋진 토크쇼가 된 것 같습니다.
    모두가 귀한 역할을 해주시네요. 감사합니다.

  • I really love you Bupryun and thanks all of your Bupmoon. I mean one single piece of Bupmoon is important to me and want to keep them all in my mind.By the way, I feel uncomfortable when you do English Bupmoon with translators and you don’t do it like you. Dali speaks poor English but he covers mostly by his own language. Sorry for the comparison but I mean this kind of translation job is unnecessary but also will not work. I strongly recommend you do it by caption instead and it’ll more effective and more comfortable.Thanks

  • Oh by the way, I do have an answer for that question, what is the meaning of life.The meaning of life is not. (34:37)
    What this phrases mean?

  • 통역하시는 분 최고이십니다
    남미에 살고 있으며 한국과
    반대로 아침을 맞아 훌륭한 스님
    의 해안과 어울리게 분위기도
    조성하시는 음성으로 감사합니다

  • 이렇게 통역 잘하는 분은 정말 본적이 없습니다! 저도 영어권에서 오랫동안 공부했지만, 불교의 어려운 사상을 이렇게 멋지게 동시통역하는 분은 정말 처음 봤습니다! 통역사분의 말씀이 마치 모차르트의 교향곡처럼 들립니다! 통역사님께 기립박수를 올리고 싶습니다!

  • Venerable Pomnyun also has his own Youtube Channel with English subtitles: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzfKXReow3r5n1JR5nVlJZw
    법륜스님 영문 유튜브 채널도 있네요! 🙂

  • 청중들 엄청 엄숙하네요… 자아의식을 내려놓기가 쉽지는 않은가 봅니다. the audience is so solemn. if you put down a little bit more self consciousness, you can listen with ease.

  • 통역분 전에도 느꼈지만, 스님 말씀들 요점을 잔구더기 없이, 핵심이 다 담기게 전달 잘 하시네요. 스님 말씀과 강연을 정확하게 파악을 하기 때문에 의도한 의미를 핵심있게 잘 전달하는거 같네요.

  • Wow Jet Lee, his second job's been a translator for Korean lol It's kidding, thou how similar they both look like!! Jet Lee also once wanted to be a monk as well

  • 스티브잡스가 스님을 알고갔다면 구글에 영향을 더 빨리 줄수 있었을것 같아요ㅠㅠ 불교 영향이 큰 잡스의 멘토가 될수도 있었을듯하구요. 이미 스님은 구글 잡스와 상관없이 훌륭하지만 세상에 좀 더 큰 영향을 끼칠수 있었을텐데 아쉬운 마음이 드네요.

  • 통역 너무 멋있습니다
    통역으로 우주의 일을 한다는것이 참 부럽고 행복해보입니다

    늘 행복하시고
    늘 건강하시고

    모두모두 하나임을 알아차립니다
    오늘은 인류에대한 사랑을 느낍니다

    모든이의 길잡이이신
    스님
    감사합니다

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