Twin Towers Music In our Schools Month Concert


– Well, hello. Good evening… And welcome to our Music in
Our School’s Month celebration, our annual tradition of
celebrating, well, just that, music in our schools. Okay, so probably not
the best way to introduce our 6th grade orchestra tonight, but here they are under the
direction of Mrs. Amanda Mita. (clapping) (zealous orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) – So, that is our sixth grade orchestra. That piece is called A Million Miles Away. We all might wish we
were a million miles away with all the storms. But it’s actually supposed
depict travel in space, so hopefully you heard the
idea of exploring space, and the great beyond, and the unknown. That also featured the
violas and second violins doing a real cool
technique called spiccato. That’s where you bounce your bow, that was that bouncing
action you heard along. They worked really, really hard, so they deserve that I talk about it because they worked
really proud to get that. The next piece is called
Fantasy on a Japanese Folk Tune, and I’m sure you’ll recognize it. You’ve probably heard them
perform it in some way before. (soft string music) (reflective orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) So, before we play our last piece, they’re not paying any attention to me. There are two people backstage
that I just can’t keep away. Now, they’re like, “Oh,
she’s talking about us.” Jacob Isenchout and Vincent
Lamb, if you wanna give a wave, have come back for both
concerts this year, they can’t stay away, to help us tune, to help us get ready. They deserve a round of applause, even though they’re camera shy. (cheering and clapping) So, even though they graduated
from Twin Towers last year, they just can’t stay away, and they come back to help us tune, and solve any string
problems that I may have. And the high school concert is Friday. Yep, it’s Friday if you wanna go check out where we’re all heading in a couple years. You could check out their March concert, which is always pretty interesting, and they do some really fun tunes. Our last piece is called
Gauntlet, and again, thank you so much. Music in our Schools wouldn’t be possible unless you brought them all here, and you put up with
their practicing at home, and carrying their instruments, especially those of you
who have instruments in your house the size of a toddler. So, we appreciate that. And our last piece from
the sixth grade orchestra is called Gauntlet. (pensive string music) (zealous orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) This is the seventh
grade theory orchestra. They meet separate from seventh
and eight grade orchestra, and like before, they
can’t possibly go through a concert without performing. They would like it if we just
played all day, all the time. But there are some other
things we have to do in theory. This piece is called Night Shift, which is working specifically
on a very difficult technique for middle school, where we start moving our hand up and down the instrument into mystery land. So, hopefully our notes
are not mystery land, and this is Night Shift. (reflective string music) (soft string music) (reflective string music) (cheering and clapping) I’m going to invite the
seventh and eight grade orchestra on stage. (bold orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) This is the seventh and
eight grade orchestra. The piece we just played
is called Wood Splitter. Our next piece is called Iowa Spring, and you’ll hear some of
the violins are searching their instrument for a
note called a harmonic. When you cut a string
in half, you get this, it’s an octave above and
this really glistening sound. I promise, we will all do it together at the start of the next
piece called Iowa Spring. (soft string music) (sentimental orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) I’m now gonna turn things
over to Ms. Amanda Cappa. We are lucky enough at Twin Towers to have two orchestra teachers. So, Ms. Amanda Cappa will
be taking over for me with the seventh and eighth graders, and she will be conducting our
final piece Spy Versus Spy. It also features Sunny Shi on piano. And it features three soloists on violin, you will notice when they stand up. I’m reminding them to stand up. And once again, thank you
so much for coming out, and all you do to make this possible. It’s really not possible
without all of you. So, thank you, and here’s our final piece. (pensive orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) – Thank you very much,
and without further ado, we’d like to invite the sixth
grade chorus up to the risers. (slow piano music) ♪ Peter Piper picked a pepper ♪ ♪ Peck of peppers ♪ ♪ A peck of pickled peppers
Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ If Peter Piper picked a
peck of pickled peppers ♪ ♪ What a peck of pickled
peppers Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ If Peter Piper picked a
peck of pickled peppers ♪ ♪ A peck of pickled peppers
Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ If Peter Piper picked a
peck of pickled peppers ♪ ♪ What a peck of pickled
peppers Peter Piper picked ♪ (upbeat piano music) ♪ Peter Piper picked a peck of ♪
♪ Peter Piper picked a peck of ♪ ♪ A peck of pickled peppers
Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ If Peter Piper picked a peck ♪
♪ If Peter Piper picked a peck ♪ ♪ What a peck of pickled
peppers Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ Peter Piper picked a peck of ♪
♪ Peter Piper picked a peck of ♪ ♪ A peck of pickled peppers
Peter Piper picked ♪ ♪ If Peter Piper picked a peck ♪
♪ If Peter Piper picked a peck ♪ ♪ What a peck of pickled
peppers Peter Piper picked ♪ (cheering and clapping) – And yes, that was so much fun to learn. So much fun, I had them
singing it faster and slower, and faster and in more parts. It was a really great piece, and we had a lot of fun with it. Our second piece is Path to the Moon. A little slower, we’re gonna
calm it down a little bit. And then after that,
we are going to invite our concert choir friends
to do a combined piece that I am sure you are all familiar with. (soft piano music) ♪ I long to sail the path to the moon ♪ ♪ On a deep blue night
when the wind is cool ♪ ♪ A glistening path that runs out to sea ♪ ♪ Silver the sails to carry me ♪ ♪ To carry ♪ ♪ Carry ♪ ♪ Carry me over the sea ♪ (soft piano music) ♪ So will I sail on a starry night ♪ ♪ On the path to the
moon a seabird’s flight ♪ ♪ Skimming the waves
where the fishes play ♪ ♪ Traveling on for many a day ♪ (reflective piano music) ♪ Silver the sails to carry me ♪ ♪ To carry ♪ ♪ Carry ♪ ♪ Carry me over the sea ♪ (soft piano music) (cheering and clapping) ♪ I wish I could be the perfect daughter ♪ ♪ But I come back to the water ♪ ♪ No matter how hard I try ♪ ♪ Every turn I take every trail I track ♪ ♪ Every path I make
every road leads back ♪ ♪ To the place I know where I can not go ♪ ♪ Though I long to be ♪ ♪ See the line where
the sky meets the sea ♪ ♪ It calls me ♪ ♪ And no one knows ♪ ♪ How far it goes ♪ ♪ If the wind in my sail on
the sea stays behind me ♪ ♪ One day I’ll know ♪ ♪ If I go there’s just no
telling how far I’ll go ♪ ♪ Oh I know everybody
on this island seems ♪ ♪ So happy on this island ♪ ♪ Everything is by design ♪ ♪ I know everybody on this island ♪ ♪ Has a role on this island ♪ ♪ So maybe I can roll with mine ♪ ♪ I can lead with pride
I can make us strong ♪ ♪ I’ll be satisfied if I play along ♪ ♪ But the voice inside
sings a different song ♪ ♪ What is wrong with me ♪ (bright piano music) ♪ See the light as it shines
on the sea it’s blinding ♪ ♪ But no one knows how deep it goes ♪ ♪ And it seems like it’s calling
out to me so come find me ♪ ♪ And let me know ♪ ♪ What’s beyond that line
will I cross that line ♪ ♪ See the line where the sky
meets the sea it calls me ♪ ♪ And no one knows how far it goes ♪ ♪ If the wind in my sail on
the sea stays behind me ♪ ♪ One day I’ll know how far I’ll go ♪ (cheering and clapping) One more piece performed
by our concert choir, Will There Really Be A Morning. I’ve selected a lot of
pieces this year for them surrounding the poet, Emily Dickinson. We’ve been reading up about
her and her different poems. And some of them come up to me, “Oh, we talked about Emily
Dickinson in English class.” Well, “Yes, you did.” So, for our last chorus piece, Will There Really Be A Morning. (bright piano music) ♪ Will there really be a morning ♪ ♪ Is there such a thing as day ♪ ♪ Could I see it from the mountains ♪ ♪ If I were as tall as they ♪ ♪ Has it feet like water lilies ♪ ♪ Has it feathers like a bird ♪ ♪ Is it brought from famous countries ♪ ♪ Of which I have never heard ♪ ♪ Which I have never heard ♪ (bright piano music) ♪ Oh some scholar ♪ ♪ Oh some sailor ♪ ♪ Oh some wise man from the skies ♪ ♪ Please do tell a little pilgrim ♪ ♪ Where the place called morning lies ♪ ♪ Will there really be a morning ♪ ♪ Will there be a morning ♪
♪ Is there such a thing as day ♪ ♪ Could I see it from the mountains ♪ ♪ If I were as tall as they ♪ ♪ Has it feet like water lilies ♪ ♪ Has it feathers like a bird ♪ ♪ Is it brought from famous countries ♪ ♪ Of which I have never heard ♪ ♪ Which I have never heard ♪ (bright piano music) ♪ Will there really be a morning ♪ ♪ Is there such a thing as day ♪ ♪ Could I see it from the mountains ♪ ♪ If I were as tall as they ♪ ♪ If I were as tall as they ♪ (bright piano music)
♪ As they ♪ ♪ Will there really be ♪ ♪ A morning ♪ (bright piano music)
♪ A morning ♪ (reflective piano music) ♪ A morning ♪ (cheering and clapping) – [Amanda Mita] Thank you so much, and here is the sixth grade band. (mid-tempo orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) – Thank you very much. That piece was actually
commissioned or written for a group of musicians who performed up in International Falls, Minnesota, where I think they see even more snow than we will be seeing
in the month of March. And it was written for
both American and Canadian children to perform together. Our next, Linden Lea, is a very famous folk song from England, and it’s been arranged
from beginning to end. It’s a tricky, tricky piece
for them to put together, and they’ve done some really
difficult and good work on it. They really pushed themselves
when I asked them to. So, we hope you enjoy Linden Lea. (gentle orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) And our last song for sixth
grade band of the night is African Dance Song, a
traditional African folk song, that they’ve also had, I
think, a lot of fun doing. A little bit different percussion here, so we hope you enjoy that. (slow percussive music) (upbeat orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) (bold orchestral music) (soft percussive music) (reflective orchestral music) (bold orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) Our next piece, Anthem For Peace, features an alto saxophone,
a soloist, Kayla Hunter, so you’ll hear her in there as well. (reflective orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) Our last piece is a march called Safety, and you may or not have
heard from your children that I’ve used the last
two months of this piece, in addition to teach them
a new time signature, to torture them with classical
bad band director jokes about the name of Safety. So, a quick poll of the
trumpet and saxophone section says that we, the joke that
I should impart upon you, band directors always have bad jokes, I’m warning you right up front, is that we programmed this piece last because we wanted to make
sure you got home safely. So, here is Safety to
safely send you home. I warned you it was bad. (laughing)
(clapping) (upbeat orchestral music) (reflective orchestral music) (upbeat orchestral music) (cheering and clapping) Thank you very much,
and despite that I heard the mutterings in the trumpet section of encouraging me to make more jokes, I will just end it with
have a great night, thank you again for coming. (cheering and clapping)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *